Mark Griffiths Inspiring Plants

An advantage of having mainly bulbs is that flowering tends to concentrate in the Autumn, Winter and early spring when there is less going on outside. The other big advantage is that the collection requires alot less effort during the summer when you perhaps want to do other things.

Growing groups of bulbs continuously over a number of years has given me some more insight into their various sensitivities. At first you obtain bulbs and those that are "easy" (for you) prosper and the rest falls away. If you grow them continuously over longer periods you come to realise that small changes in conditions have a big impact. A garden fence errected a little higher than previously, the growing shade of a tree, a few hotter or cooler summer's and the whole nature of your collection can change.

I used to grow Fritillaria without much bother but as a group with a few exceptions they have become more difficult and many now are simply just hanging on. I suspect equally there may be some genera or species I have struggled with in the past and long given up trying to re-obtain that would now flourish.

Click on the images below to the respective plant pages. This section will constantly be added to.

Allium

Alstroemeria

Bulbs covers everything with a bulb, corm or tuber that isn't a Cyclamen or Pleione.

While I started growing mainly Alpines and Cyclamen over the years the proportion of bulbs has increased. Generally many of these, especially those coming from a more Mediterranean climate are more tolerant of greenhouse culture – in particular able to deal with high summer temperatures.


Acis