Rhodohypoxis deflexa. Another fairly recent introduction, smaller than the usual bauri hypribs, it appears almost as a cushion plant with bright dark pink flowers.

Rhodohypoxis bauri confecta (right) and Rhodohypoxis milloides (right).

Confecta is supposed to be a wild form of R. Bauri but I have my doubts re the validity of that. Milloides is a fairly new introduction, taller but a nice plant.

Rhodohypoxis thodiana. Yet another fairly recent introduction, it has almost stemless pink flushed white flowers.


Rhodohypoxis thodiana. Yet another fairly recent introduction, it has almost stemless pink flushed white flowers.


From left to right. Margaret Rose, Midori, Perle? And unknown.

 Rhodoxis Sonja. The Rhodoxis are hybrids between Rhodohypoxis bauri and Hypoxis parvula – this one came to me as Summer Stars. I've been told that isn't a valid name – someone has attached that name to an already existing clone. The person that told me this was the original breeder – unfortunately I've forgotten his name!

Rhodohypoxis Fred Broome. Apparently the original clone was something different, but what we have today is a strong growing mid pink variety.

Rhodohypoxis – these are easy going plants. My own method of cultivation is in pots of ericaceous mix with added sand, kept dry(ish) in the garage for the winter and then put out in late spring. They usually need a fair amount of additional watering and a little feeding while in growth.

Unfortunately after years of this cultivation regime, some mice took up home in the garage and it looks like I have more or less lost the entire collection.

Generally the naming of the clones, especially the older ones are a bit of a mess. Some, like Albrighton and Great Scot are probably identical, others like Fred Broome are not as per the original dark pink clone. On top of that there are alot of plants being sent out that are misnamed. In my own collection (as was), labels have been lost so I'm reluctant to put a name to them.


Click on images for a larger picture.

From left to right. Great Scot, the next two came as Harlequin, and Kitty.

Mark Griffiths Inspiring Plants

From left to right. Rhodohypoxis Apple Blossom, unknown, Drakensburg Dusk and Eva Kate.